Tag Archives: knitting

Cold Sheep 2016 – January progress

The year of cold sheep started well with no yarn or fibre purchases in the month of January.

I managed to use up 162 yards of commercial yarn in a pair of mittens

http://www.ravelry.com/projects/fak/ladybird-mittens

http://www.ravelry.com/projects/fak/ladybird-mittens

and another 1,248 yards of handspun yarn in a short-sleeved dress

http://www.ravelry.com/projects/fak/laneway

http://www.ravelry.com/projects/fak/laneway

I also spun 200g of fibre into 766 yards of fingering weight yarn.

http://www.ravelry.com/people/fak/handspun/jane-seymour-2

http://www.ravelry.com/people/fak/handspun/jane-seymour-2

Total yarn out: 1,410 yards
Total yarn in: 766 yards

Net yarn reduction: 644 yards

Fibre stash reduction: 200g.

It’s a start.

Ladybird mittens

A playful pair of mittens that mimic ladybirds. Keep your fingers warm and a smile on your (and everyone else’s) face while we await the return of these aphid-loving creatures from their winter hibernation.

Click on image for more photos

Click on image for more photos

The colourwork pattern is fully charted and adaptable for longer or shorter hands, narrower or wider thumbs. Written instructions accompany the colourwork chart, explaining how to work the cuff, top and thumb gusset.

The pattern is sized for average adult hands (circumference 6.5”/16cm, length 7”/18cm) but it can be adjusted by altering your gauge.

Yarn requirements:

  • 135-160 yards fingering weight/4-ply/sock yarn in main colour
  • 25-50 yards fingering weight/4-ply/sock yarn in contrast colour

You don’t even have to stick to red and black.

Available in high-res format only, no printer friendly version as contains colourwork charts.

Available to buy here.

Shetland sweater pack – part 2

I have previously posted about what happened to the first part of the Shetland sweater pack from Hilltopcloud that I spun up into 2,396 yards of fingering weight 2-ply yarn. The first part was turned into a sweater and I liked the pattern Chantalle so much (and having already paid for it) I decided to turn the remainder of my sweater pack yarn into a cardigan version of the same pattern.

This pattern is worked top-down, so once I had completed the yoke I was able to work the arms to the desired length and then just keep on knitting until almost all of the yarn was used up, finishing with some ribbing. I am very happy with the result, and look forward to using up some of my other handspun yarn on similar large projects such as this.

http://www.ravelry.com/projects/fak/chantalle-2

http://www.ravelry.com/projects/fak/chantalle-2

I love how the variegation in the dyeing is shown off by the simple stockinette majority, but is not lost in the lace sections.

http://www.ravelry.com/projects/fak/chantalle-2

http://www.ravelry.com/projects/fak/chantalle-2

 

Shetland sweater pack – part 1

My favourite indie fibre dyer, Katie Weston at hilltopcloud, offers Shetland sweater packs in 500g continuous strips. I spun mine up as part of this year’s Tour de Fleece, but only recently got round to working with it. The idea is that 500g should be enough to allow you to knit or crochet an entire sweater. I spun my fibre up to a fingering weight (my preferred weight of yarn to work with), managing to create 2,396 yards total.

http://www.ravelry.com/people/fak/handspun/shetland-sweater-pack

 

I wanted a simple pattern to show off the variations from the dyeing and spinning, so picked Chantalle by Vanessa Smith. This pattern is mostly stockinette with a lace collar in a v-neck. It knit up nice and quickly and only used 231g (1,092 yards), under half of the sweater pack.

http://www.ravelry.com/projects/fak/chantalle

http://www.ravelry.com/projects/fak/chantalle

I plan on using the remainder of the pack to make the same pattern, but this time in a cardigan.

Iceland!

I am going to Iceland for a few days in December to celebrate my sister’s 40th birthday. As well as planning to leave space in my luggage for Icelandic wool to bring back, I thought I would take this opportunity to knit a traditional Icelandic cardigan to take and wear whilst there. Just to go that extra mile I also spun the yarn from Icelandic fibre in natural colours (and the pattern I worked from was written in Icelandic, which I can’t read, but the colourwork had charts).

It went from fibre:

To yarn:

http://www.ravelry.com/people/fak/handspun/brown-icelandic-top

http://www.ravelry.com/people/fak/handspun/dark-grey-icelandic-top

http://www.ravelry.com/people/fak/handspun/black-icelandic-top

http://www.ravelry.com/people/fak/handspun/white-icelandic

To cardigan:

http://www.ravelry.com/projects/fak/lett-lopapeysa-me-stuttum-munsturbekk-og-hettu

http://www.ravelry.com/projects/fak/lett-lopapeysa-me-stuttum-munsturbekk-og-hettu

 

http://www.ravelry.com/projects/fak/lett-lopapeysa-me-stuttum-munsturbekk-og-hettu